Home   •   Inbox   •   Archive   •   Theme Credit
September 2014
18
Via   •   Source
September 2014
18
Via   •   Source

Anonymous asked

I hear people all the time saying that I need to diversify my characters. Ok, that's fine, but I also hear that I shouldn't explicitly write race. Like "why would you tell the reader she's black, does her race really matter?" How can I find a good balance between the two?

characterandwritinghelp:

Saying race doesn’t matter is an argument I am getting extremely tired of, because one never hears this about white characters (“why would you tell the reader she’s white, does her race really matter?”). This is an instance of writing colorblind, which really is no better than not writing diversity at all. The crux of this argument is that white is default, and any varying from the default needs a plot-sanctioned reason to be different. This is not true.

Race is an important part of what makes a person who they are—it should not be erased or straight-up ignored. At the same time, it also doesn’t need to be a “very special episode about race” issue with every POC you write. Characters can be of any race without it having to be a central part of their story, and their race will still inform who they are.

Check:

Short answer: Diversify your cast and never, ever feel like you have to justify why a character is of a certain race. Race doesn’t need a reason, and anyone who thinks that race has to be explained in order to earn a place in a story is wrong.

-Headless

September 2014
18
Via   •   Source

lilypottar:

Hey babe are you a hippogriff? Because I need to respect you before I mount you

#omfg   
September 2014
18
Via   •   Source

oliciity:

Season 1 vs Season 5 

[SCREAMS CHARACTER REGRESSION FROM THE ROOFTOPS]

September 2014
18
Via   •   Source

Learn to love solitude, to be more alone with yourselves. The tragedy of today’s young people is that they try to unite on the basis of carrying out noisy and aggressive actions so as not to feel lonely, and this is a sad thing. The individual must learn from childhood to be on his own, for this doesn’t mean to be lonely: it means to not get bored with oneself, because a person who finds himself bored when he is alone, it seems to me, is a person in danger.

 - Andrei Tarkovsky on being asked, ‘What would you like to tell young people?’  (via marcmumford)
September 2014
17
Via   •   Source
September 2014
17
Via   •   Source
September 2014
17
Via   •   Source

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

 -

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

whoo boy am I sick of this, yuuuup

(via faitherinhicks)

I never thought about it like this before, not in conscious terms, but yeah, I’ve noticed this, too. This is really crappy!

(via doctordischordia)

September 2014
17
Via   •   Source

accioheadcanons:

lmaoalien:

plot twist: JK rowling writes a series on voldemorts point of view

"i looked in the mirror and cried. i look like an egg"

#lmao   #harry potter